Tag: buying a home

5 Questions to Ask Yourself Before Buying a Home

How Long Do I Plan to Live in the House?

Before you decide to buy a home you should review your goals and timelines. It is important to know how long you plan to live in your home.

Each timeline will have different goals for financing so plan this up front to save the most money with your mortgage!

Short Term Housing

If you plan on staying in a home for a very short amount of time, under a year for example, you may be better off renting. Closing costs and costs to sell a home may take away any financial benefits of owning.

The Starter Home

If you know you will be moving within 1-3 years you will want to structure your financing to get the lowest closing costs for your mortgage. Ask your loan officer about Lender Paid Closing Costs.

No Plan on Moving Soon

If you plan on living in your home between 3-5 years, getting a balanced mortgage with a low rate and low closing costs will be the best fit.

Buying the Forever Home

If you are buying your “forever home” and plan to stay in your home for at least 5 years, then getting the lowest rate should be a priority. Even if you have more costs up front, the monthly savings from having a lower rate and payment will pay off in the long term.

Do I Plan to Do Home Improvements?

When you buy a home, the first rule is Location, Location, Location. You can make any home into your dream home but you cannot change the location. Sometimes you have to sacrifice some of your needs and wants to get a home in the “Right” location.

This may mean that you need to buy a home and do home improvements after you purchase. If you know the home you are buying will need some work, it is important to budget for these repairs.

Ask yourself these key questions when it comes to home improvements:

  • How do you plan to pay for the home improvements?
  • How quickly will the upgrades need to be completed?
  • Will you save up and pay cash or finance the repairs?
  • Will you do the repairs yourself or hire it out?

If the repairs are significant, you may want to consider a Home Renovation Mortgage when you purchase which allows you to finance in repairs.

Do I Want to Keep Cash on Hand or Make a Large Down Payment

There is an old saying when it comes to money, “Cash is King!” This saying holds true when it comes to owning a home. It is important to have some cash saved up when buying a home.

There are several things to consider when it comes to using your cash when buying a home:

  • Should you keep money in the bank for emergencies or home repairs?
  • Should you use your cash for investments or retirement?
  • Should you make a large down payment to lower your monthly mortgage payment?

These are all important things to consider when budgeting to buy a home. For some, applying a 20% down payment will help them to avoid Private Mortgage Insurance (PMI) which will result in a lower monthly payment.

For others, getting a zero down mortgage or putting down only 3% may allow them to buy the home they want and have money left over for Home Improvements or repairs.

How Quickly Do I want to be Debt Free

When buying a home, it is important to plan for the long term future. You should ask yourself how quickly you want to become debt free by paying off your mortgage.

For some, buying a home is only the start of their adult life and they need to have flexibility to have low monthly mortgage payments. A 30 Year Fixed rate mortgage may be the best fit in this scenario.

For others that are nearing retirement age, going with a shorter term mortgage, like a 15 Year Fixed Rate Mortgage may be the best fit. Typically a shorter term will have a lower interest rate and will help you to pay off your mortgage more quickly.

Home Buyer Advice

There are several things to consider when buying a home which makes it important to work with an experience mortgage professional such as a mortgage broker.

A mortgage broker will help you to review your goals and structure a loan to help you save money. They can do calculations such as a break even analysis to advise if you would be better off with a low closing cost mortgage or a low rate mortgage.

To Speak with a Licensed Michigan Mortgage Broker call Riverbank Finance today at 800-555-2098 or request information below.

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How to Get Your Offer Accepted

tips to get your offer accepted

If you have been searching for a house in the last couple of years, you will be familiar with what the real estate industry calls a “lack of inventory”.  This means that there are more people looking to buy houses than there are people interested in selling homes and there is more competition on each home.  This imbalance causes a housing shortage which can be a frustrating situation for families looking to buy a home and makes getting your offer accepted a tough task.

The housing shortage has created a spike in home prices. According to the National Association of Realtors, “The median existing-home price for all housing types in March was $250,400, up 5.8 percent from March 2017 ($236,600).” This increase in prices has been affecting home affordability nationwide.

Infographic from http://www.simplifyingthemarket.com/en/2018/04/27/existing-home-sales-grow-despite-low-inventory-infographic/

Locally in West Michigan, it is very difficult to find affordable homes under the $200,000 range. For first time homebuyers and those looking to downsize they are seeing multiple offer situations and bids far over the home’s listing price. Some desperate buyers are going as far as to waive their right to inspections and guaranteeing to pay above appraisal amounts. For those that do not have access to large amounts of cash, they may have a hard time competing with their bids.

How to Get your Offer Accepted to Buy a Home in a Sellers Market in Michigan

Getting your offer noticed in a stack of multiple offers is not an easy feat. Many sellers are reviewing several offers for their home and simply disregarding lower priced offers and also offers with contingencies and what they consider riskier financing. Here are 8 tips on how to make your offer stand out and get your offer accepted to buy a home in Michigan.

1) Get a Strong Pre-Approval to Strengthen your Offer

To get your offer accepted there are several things a buyer can do. First of all you should speak with a local, knowledgeable, licensed loan officer that can Pre-Approval you for the strongest type of mortgage that you can qualify for. Typically sellers see conventional as the best type of financing because it has less requirements for the home’s condition than other loan types and can close quickly. Receiving a strong pre-approval from a local lender will put you a leg up on the competition with generic automated letters from the big national companies.

2) Consider Alternatives to Seller Paid Closing Costs

If a buyer does not have enough funds to cover their own closing costs then it is a common practice to ask the sellers to pay their closing costs as part of their offer. The sellers will view this as additional costs and reduce their proceeds from the sale. Alternatives to Seller Paid closing costs should be considered including:

  • Pay your own closing costs
  • Ask about low down payment or zero down loans
  • Get a gift from a family member for your costs
  • Ask the lender for lender credit option to reduce your costs
  • Look for ways to reduce your closing cost by shopping insurance and title company fees

3) Give the Sellers Occupancy After the Closing

Many sellers are hesitant to sell because they are fearful that they will not be able to find a new home in time to transition their belongings to a new house. It may help to calm their fears by giving them extra time to move after you close on the purchase of their house. It is common these day to offer 30 days after close for the seller to vacate the property. This may be an important reason why they choose your offer over others.

4) Personalize your Offer By Writing a Letter

As cheesy as it sounds to write a heart felt letter, my experience shows that it works! Many times there are a lot of emotions and memories that come with a house. It may be the place where they raised their children.

They may have put sweat and tears into building the house. It might have been a house that was in the family for generations.  All these factors compel the sellers to want to make sure it goes to a deserving family that will appreciate it as much as they do. Simply tell them why your happy little family would be deserving and that you will take great care of the place.

5) Offer to Pay Seller’s Closing Costs

If you have access to cash and feel strongly about getting your offer accepted, you could offer to pay for the sellers closing costs. In Michigan, Property Transfer Tax and Owner Title Insurance are typically paid by the seller unless otherwise agreed to by the buyer. If a buyer agrees to pay the sellers closing fees, the sellers would net more from the sale and walk away with more money.

6) Remove Contingencies from your Offer

Many times families will have contingencies before they can buy. For example, if you plan on selling your home before buying your next home, then you may write your offer contingent upon the sale of your home. This is a risky unknown for sellers. Your house may take a long time to sell which would not work with the seller’s timeline.

If you are able to qualify for a new home while still owning your other home, then it may be advantageous to submit your offer without a contingency for the sale of your home. Other contingencies you could remove would include appraising at sales price, or even waiving property inspections. These should be carefully considered as a last resort to get your offer accepted.

7) Adding an Escalation Clause as Part of your Offer

Speak with your real estate agent about how an escalation clause may work for your situation. In general, a clause would be added stating that if someone else offers higher than your offer, you will automatically increase your bid higher than theirs. You would want to make sure you set a cap on the maximum amount you are willing to offer.

8) Ask your Loan Officer to Call the Listing Agent to Confirm your Pre-Approval

Having a loan officer that will go above and beyond to fight for you is an important part of buying a home. Studies show that having a local loan officer versus a big bank or online lender increases the strength of your pre-approval. Part of a seller’s concern when reviewing offers on their home is that the buyer’s financing may fall through. If your loan officer has already received your documentation and confirmed that you are a well qualified buyer, then ask them to call the listing agent to confirm the details and give the sellers confidence in accepting your offer!

To review home loan options with a Licensed Loan officer simply complete the form below to request a free consultation or call us now at 1-800-555-2098.

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VA Loans for Reservists and National Guard

As a Reservist or member of the National Guard, did you know that you could be eligible for a no down payment VA Loan? If you’re thinking about refinancing or buying a house, maybe you didn’t even realize the VA Loan could be an option for you. Although your role is different than that of a regular military member, you are still eligible to receive VA Loan benefits, with a few different qualifications. Here’s what you need to know.

VA Loan Requirements

The VA Loan was created to help veterans purchase homes, and the U.S. government provides a loan guaranty on it. It is a zero down-payment home loan with more flexibility and lower payments than conventional loans, which require 20% down. The VA Loan is only available to U.S. veterans and current military members — and that includes Reservists and National Guard.

VA Loan requirements for Reservists and National Guard are a bit stricter than those for regular military members. To be eligible for a VA Loan, you have to meet at least one of the following qualifications:

  • Six years in the Selective Reserve or National Guard, and you must have either been honorably discharged, retired, or transferred to the Standby Reserve or an element of the Ready Reserve
  • 90 days of active duty service during a wartime period
  • Discharged or released from active duty service for a service-related disability

VA Funding Fee

When you take out a VA Loan, you will have to pay a funding fee, which goes to the VA to help offset the cost of any loans that end up in default. If you have a service-related disability and are currently receiving disability compensation or are entitled to it, you would not have to pay the funding fee.

Related: Use our VA Loan Calculator to estimate total mortgage payments and VA guaranty fees!

The difference for Reservists and National Guard members is that the funding fee is slightly higher than it is for regular military members. If you take out a VA Loan with zero down, as a regular military member, you’d have to pay 2.15 percent for the first loan and 3.3 percent for any subsequent loans. As a Reservist or National Guard member, your funding fee would be 2.4 percent for the first loan and 3.3 percent for any subsequent loans.

If you have a 5-10 percent down payment, as a regular military member, you’d pay 1.5 percent funding fee for the first and any subsequent loan. With a 10-20 percent down payment, you’d have to pay a 1.25 percent funding fee for the first and any subsequent loan.

With a 5-10 percent down payment, as a Reservist or National Guard member, your funding fee would be 1.75 percent for the first and any subsequent loan. With a 10-20 percent down payment, your funding fee would be 1.5 percent for the first and any subsequent loan.

We, at Riverbank Finance, are grateful for our service members and would like to help you own the home of your dreams or refinance on your current home. To find out whether you are eligible for a VA Loan, contact one of our loan officers at (800) 555-2098 to schedule an appointment.

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How High Will Interest Rates Go This Year?

Mortgage interest rates have been slowly increasing since they plummeted following the 2008 financial crisis. Twice this year already, the Federal Reserve has raised interest rates, which, in turn, raises the rate at which banks loan out money for mortgages. But are they done raising rates this year, or could more hikes be on the way?

Will the FED raise interest rates?

Here’s a few ways you can tell a rate increase is on the way:

  • Language of the FED. This past week on Wednesday, the Federal Reserve met and decided not to raise rates this month but indicated that a raise is “coming soon.” Most analysts take the language in that statement to mean before the end of 2017, another increase will be on the way, possibly as soon as September.
  • How markets reacted to the last increase. Instability in the marketplace often translates to more caution on the part of the FED. According to their own account, the last increase went with little to no instability.
  • PCE. Personal Consumption Expenditure, or PCE, is the FEDs favorite measure of economic health for the economy. Two-thirds of all economic spending (or growth in the FED’s mind) is measured in this index.
    • While this acronym is pretty simple, the index itself is multi-faceted. It Includes “Durable Goods,” like cars and houses; “non-durables,” like food and clothing; and services.
  • Inflation. Inflation is the rising cost of goods and services. Usually this happens for three reasons:
    • Wages are increasing, thus making things more expensive to make and sell. (The average wage for an employee in Grand Rapids, Michigan, falls around $45-50,000 annually.
    • Increased demand, due to credit being more accessible.
    • Government monetary policy (printing money).

How Much Will Interest Rates Rise This Year?

Interest rates before the economic crisis in 2007 were around 6.5%. Currently interest rates are at 1.25%. At the beginning of the year, the FED had hoped to get the rate back to 2%, but, at the last meeting, FED officials revised that to 1.5% due to the size of economic growth this year. We are growing, but slower than they forecasted.

What are current mortgage rates?

Mortgage rates have been hovering around the 4% range for 2017 for a 30 year fixed rate mortgage. The rates for home loans shot up to the mid to low 4’s at the beginning of this year but have slowly dropped back down to the range it has been at for the past few years.   The exact mortgage rate will depend on your specific situation including loan amount, loan-to-value ratio, credit score and loan program.

Related: Current Mortgage Rates

Should I buy a house before interest rates go up?

Interest rates will likely not rise to 2% this year. That doesn’t mean the FED won’t try to reach that goal next year, or perhaps go even higher than that. So, while rates are slowly rising, they are still lower than they were ten years ago for those searching for a mortgage.

For West Michigan, the rates being this low means an increase in demand for new homes. While rates have ticked up, the housing boom hasn’t slowed. If you want to take advantage of interest rates before they rise again, speak with a loan officer about your mortgage options. Call Riverbank Finance at (800) 555-2098.

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15 vs. 30-Year Loan: Which is right for me?

What’s the deal with 15 and 30-year mortgage loan rates? If you’ve ever shopped around for a new mortgage, you’ve seen lenders advertising rates for both. There are pros and cons to both, depending on what you want to do with the mortgage. But there’s also the unknown fact that “15 to 30” aren’t the only term options. Which is right for you? Well, it depends.

What stage are you in life? Are you just starting a family? Are your kids going off to college and suddenly you’re an empty-nester with too much space? The key to determining which loan will work best for you is finding out how much is in your budget and what fits your life phase. When sitting down with one of our loan consultants, it’s important to let them know what your life goals are so they can help match up a loan term that fits your lifestyle.

15-Year Loan

A 15-year loan has one advantage over a 30-year loan no matter what: less interest paid over time. Because of the nature of the loan, you’ll pay it off faster, so you wind up paying a lot less interest over time. The caveat is that the payments are going to be higher each month. A 15-year loan will tighten your wallet until it’s paid off, but it’ll be paid off in half the time.

How much is the difference between the two terms? If you use our mortgage calculator and put in a mortgage worth $150,000, the interest at the end of the term for 15 years is about $61,000 (at 4.875% interest.) That same loan, when the term is changed to 30 years, more than doubles to about $135,000 dollars in interest over the life of the loan.

30-Year Loan

So, why would anyone want a longer term loan? For starters, the payments for 15 years, using the same scenario, is about $1,200 month. That same loan, at 30 years, only requires about $700 dollars a month.

A 30-year term is great for the home of your dreams. If you have no desire to leave that home, or downsizing and retirement are decades away, a 30-year loan is probably the best option. Although you pay more money overall, it gives you more flexibility during the time of the loan.

One common misconception about these loan terms is that 15 or 30 are the only options. Through Riverbank Finance, you can secure a loan for 15 to 30 years or somewhere in between. That’s right! So, for example, if you’re retiring in 25 years, you could set a 25-year term so your home is paid off right in time for retirement. For Riverbank Finance, it’s all about customizing your mortgage to fit the lifestyle you desire.

For more information, or to speak with a loan officer, call Riverbank Finance at (800) 555-2098 to schedule an appointment.

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Buy A House with a Small Down Payment

If you are a first-time homebuyer, getting a mortgage may seem overwhelming — especially with all the different options available. Maybe you don’t have a lot of money for a down payment or your credit isn’t great. The good news is, you can still qualify for a home loan. Here are 4 low or no down payment options that can help you, as a first-time homebuyer, get into the house of your dreams.

FHA Loan

With an FHA loan, all you need is a 3.5% minimum down payment to buy your first home. Because the Federal Housing Administration backs the FHA loan, the qualifications are a bit more lenient. People who have no established credit or small savings for a down payment, and even a credit score as low as 580 can qualify. The FHA loan is also available to immigrants who have a Visa or Green Card, as well as those who have gaps in their employment.

It’s also easier to qualify for an FHA loan if you’ve filed for bankruptcy. With a conventional loan, you have to wait four years after filing Chapter 7 to apply for a mortgage. With the FHA loan, you only have to wait two years. If you filed for Chapter 13, you only have to wait one year. You can also get an FHA loan three years after being foreclosed on your previous property.

VA Loan

The government created the VA loan to provide home ownership to veterans and military personnel. Like the FHA loan, the government backs the VA loan for extra security, so qualifying is easier. To qualify, you must get a certificate of eligibility from the Veterans Administration. Having bad credit may not hinder you from getting approved. VA loans require no down payment or Private Mortgage Insurance (PMI). Veterans can choose either a 30-year fixed VA loan or a 15-year fixed VA loan for up to $424,100. They may also get a cash-out refinance of up to 100% of their home.

USDA Rural Development Loan

For those wishing to buy a home in a rural area, the USDA Rural Development Loan requires zero down payment, making it great for first-time home buyers. The government also backs this loan for added security, so there’s low or no PMI attached to it. You only have to pay a 1% guarantee fee upfront and 0.5% each year after that. That’s less than the 1.75% up front and 0.85% each year with the FHA loan. If you’ve recently filed for bankruptcy or were foreclosed, you won’t have to wait too long to qualify for a USDA loan.

Conventional 1% Down Mortgage

Important Update! Last date for loan submissions is 5/31/2018. Program is being discontinued.

Riverbank Finance offers homebuyers a way to put only 1% down on a home and still get a conventional mortgage. In this case, the home buyer puts 1% down and the lender (Riverbank Finance) contributes 2%, giving home buyer 3% equity when closing on the home. Freddie Mac created this option to make homes more affordable for new buyers. It allows people to buy a new home for, essentially, the cost of one month’s rent and avoid PMI altogether or drop PMI in the future. Your 1% down payment may be a gift from someone, you must have at least a 700 FICO score, and your debt-to-income (DTI) ratio is limited to 43%.

For more information or to speak with a loan officer about any of these mortgage options, call Riverbank Finance at (800) 555-2098.

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Mortgage Bankers vs. Mortgage Lenders vs. Mortgage Brokers

Bankers and Lenders and Brokers, Oh My!

Mortgage Bankers

When many prospective homebuyers think about getting pre-approved for a mortgage, they picture their local bank. They stop by the nearest branch, are greeted by a friendly teller, and ask to speak to a loan officer. There’s nothing inherently wrong with this concept, but it certainly isn’t the only way to obtain a mortgage.

Mortgage Lenders

Mortgage Lenders exist with the sole purpose of originating home mortgages. They do not have checking accounts or ATMs. Generally, they originate the mortgage, but once it closes and funds, they sell it to a mortgage servicer, and use the money to originate new mortgages. Mortgage lenders are also referred to as Direct Lenders or Retail Lenders.

Mortgage Brokers

Mortgage Brokers are basically a financial matchmaker, matching homebuyers to mortgage lenders. They develop relationships with multiple Wholesale Lenders to originate mortgages through the loan programs those lenders offer. Mortgage Brokers take a loan application, then send it to the lender who offers the best rate and terms for that borrower’s financial situation.

Which option is best for you?

Riverbank Finance is a Mortgage Broker, so I’m more than a little biased, but let me explain! Mortgage Brokers are a great option for most borrowers because we have access to more programs and encourage competition amongst our lenders—both of which drive pricing down. We also charge zero origination fees on the majority of our loan programs.

Working with a Mortgage Broker saves borrowers more than just money— it also saves hours of time! We shop our lenders’ rates and fees everyday, and know the program guidelines inside and out. Unlike banks and lenders, we do not add any additional overlays to our lenders program guidelines—their minimums are our minimums, allowing us to serve borrowers that others can’t.

Get More Information

To apply for a Mortgage, call Riverbank Finance today at 1-800-555-2098.

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Buy a Home with No Closing Costs

Buy a Home with No Closing Costs

An alarming number of first time homebuyers are unaware that mortgages involve closing costs, and which often creates a financial obstacle. Here, we’ll explain not only what closing costs are, but more importantly, how to avoid paying them!

What are Closing Costs?

Closing costs are additional fees a homebuyer is responsible for, outside of the down payment, at the time of closing. They include things like lender fees, title fees, government fees, and prepaid items such as property taxes and homeowner’s insurance. See below for a more conclusive list of closing costs you may encounter.

Lender Fees
• Credit Report Fee
• Application Fee (if applicable)
• Origination Fees (if applicable)
Appraisal Fee
Flood Certification Fee
Title Fees
• Chain of Title
• Owner’s Title Insurance (typically paid by the seller in Michigan)
• Lender’s Title Insurance
• Closing Fee
• Courier Fee
Government Fees
• Recording Fees
• Transfer Tax (typically paid by the seller in Michigan)
Real Estate Broker Fees (if applicable)
Prepaid Items
• Per Diem Interest
• Property Taxes
• Homeowner’s Insurance
• Tax Prorations (to reimburse the seller for taxes they already paid)

Related: Transfer Tax Calculator and Title Insurance Calculator

How Much are Closing Costs?

Closing costs vary based on factors such as loan amount, location (state and locality) of the property, and lender fees. Total closing costs typically range between 3-6 percent of the sale price. As stated above, not all fees apply in every loan situation. For instance, here in Michigan, title insurance and transfer taxes are typically paid by the seller.

Ask your buyer’s agent about what (if any) fees their brokerage charges for their services, as their administrative fees can range up to $500. Lender fees can also have a large impact on a homebuyer’s total closing costs. Here at Riverbank Finance, we don’t charge any additional lender fees for most loan programs! Be sure to ask your loan officer what fees you can expect to pay for their services.

Can I Avoid Paying Closing Costs?

There are several ways in which homebuyers can avoid paying closing costs. The most common way to do this is to request seller paid closing costs when writing an initial offer on a property. Each loan program is different, but allows for a percent of the purchase price to be given back– up to 3% on Conventional, 4% on VA, and 6% on FHA and USDA. For example, if you are purchasing a $200,000 home with a VA mortgage, you can request seller paid closing costs of up to $8,000.

Homebuyers should also speak with their loan officers about no-closing cost loan programs. By utilizing lender credits, buyers can reduce or even eliminate their closing costs altogether—ask your loan officer if you qualify for lender paid closing costs! Here at Riverbank we charge NO APPLICATION FEES and most of our loan programs have NO LENDER FEES.

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To apply for a Mortgage or Refinance with NO closing costs, call Riverbank Finance today at 1-800-555-2098.

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VA Loans Just Got Better

 

For eligible servicemembers, veterans, and surviving spouses, the existing VA home loan program just got better! The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) has introduced a new policy regarding how student loan debt affects mortgage eligibility.

Related: VA Loans for Military Veterans

VA loosens Guidelines for Student Loans

The new policy makes it easier for VA eligible borrowers to obtain a purchase or refinance loan, by changing the way student loan monthly payments are calculated. Prior to this change, 1% of the total student loan debt had to be counted toward the borrower’s debt-to-income (DTI) ratio each month, regardless of actual monthly payment structure or deferment. Now, however, the payment will be calculated based on 5% of the total student loan debt, divided by 12 months. Clear as mud, right?

Lets do some math!

For example, lets say John has $65,000 in student loan debt. Formerly, his monthly student loan payment would have been $65,000 * 1% (.01) = $650. Now, his payment will be $65,000 * 5% (.05) / 12 = $271.

What if John is on an income-based repayment structure, and only pays $250 per month? The new policy also allows a statement from John’s student loan servicer to be provided, allowing the calculated payment to reflect the actual loan terms.

What if John’s student loans are in deferment? If his repayment is scheduled to begin within 12 months from the estimated closing date, we must use the 5% / 12 months rule. If not, however, the payment can be omitted altogether if written evidence can be provided that repayment will be deferred at least another 12 months from the closing date.

By changing the way student loan payments are calculated, more VA eligible borrowers will qualify, and for a larger amount. Check out our VA Mortgage Calculator to estimate your monthly payment on a desired home purchase.

What is a VA home loan?

VA home loans are originated by private lenders, banks, and mortgage companies, but the VA guarantees a portion of the loan, allowing us to offer you more favorable terms. VA purchase loans help you buy a home with a low interest rate, without requiring a down payment or private mortgage insurance (PMI). There are also special VA loan programs for Cashout and Streamline Refinances.

Who is eligible for a VA home loan?

Active servicemembers, veterans, and surviving spouses are eligible for VA home loan programs, with a valid certificate of eligibility (COE). Length of service or service commitment, duty status and character of service determine each veteran’s eligibility for specific benefits. All VA borrowers are still subject to the minimum credit score requirement of 580 and sufficient income levels to cover expected monthly obligations. For more specific information on eligibility and requirements, visit the VA benefits website.

For More Information Visit the VA Student Loan Announcement.

Get More Information

To apply for a VA Mortgage or Refinance call Riverbank Finance today at 1-800-555-2098.

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