Tag: student debt

5 Mortgage Myths that are no Longer True

While it can be useful to listen to the advice from others who have gotten a mortgage, you might have heard some wrong information. Or, at the very least, dated information. Here are 5 rules that no longer are true for getting a mortgage:

1. You need a 20% down payment.

I recently spoke to my grandmother about her family’s first home purchase. She told me that they didn’t get a mortgage because, at the time they bought their home, mortgage rates were at a whopping 12%. My parents often warned me that you need to save at least 20% to make a down payment on a house. Fortunately, rates are not 12% anymore, and you don’t need a 20% down payment. Some loans don’t require a down payment at all.

Related: Conventional 1% Down Mortgage

2. Your credit score has to be perfect.

We’ve all made mistakes. Some of us have paid our credit cards late or forgot a medical bill. Those mistakes can wind up hurting your credit score. But the good news is, you don’t need a score of 750 to score a loan anymore! Riverbank Finance has helped borrowers with scores as low as 580 obtain loans.

3. You can’t have student debt.

It used to be assumed that you couldn’t get a loan until that festering student loan from college was paid off. Not true! Student loan debt is no longer a hindrance from acquiring the loan you need for your home. Guidelines are becoming easier to qualify for a mortgage with student loan debt. While our loan officers will need to know how much you owe and the type of loan you are seeking, having student debt isn’t a dead end.

4. Pay it off as fast as you can.

There are numerous “Get out of Debt” gurus who advocate paying off debts aggressively. To some of them, a success story is when a family scrimps and saves to pay off their mortgage within 5 years of buying their home. While paying off a mortgage is always the right thing to do, there are wrong ways to go about doing so: In order for this particular family to pay theirs off, they stopped paying into their 401k, their college savings for their kids, and saving in general. That was not the best plan, because they stopped preparing for their future.

If you want to pay off your mortgage quickly, you must also consider early prepayment penalties. Some loans have rules as to how much a borrower can pay back early. Pay too much, and that money may go to just eating a fee instead of eating away at your interest.

5. Buy the most expensive house you can.

On the surface, buying the most expensive house you can afford seems like a good idea. A home is an investment, after all. Really, when sitting down with one of our loan officers, what you’ll find is they’ll ask questions to help fit what you can afford and what you need into a mortgage. You may not need a home with 6 bedrooms, 4 bathrooms, and 20 acres of land. Think of the upkeep you’ll need to budget for landscaping alone.

It’s important to be upfront about the kind of needs you have when seeking a loan. Schedule an appointment with one of our mortgage professionals at (800) 555-2098 for more information.

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Buying a Home with Student Loan Debt

Buying a Home with Student Loan Debt

In a few short months, thousands of college students across the country will walk across a stage, shake a hand, and graduate from a university with a degree and more than likely… a whole lot of debt. Student loans are often necessary to reach your educational goals, but will they affect your ability to qualify for other financing in the future? Here’s what you’ll need to know.

Qualifying for a Mortgage with Student Loan Debt

How your student loans will affect your ability to qualify for a mortgage depends on two things: the total amount you owe, and what type of home loan program you are applying for. There are many loan programs available today and they each treat student debt differently, by the way they calculate your monthly payment.

FHA & USDA Mortgages and Student Loan Debt

Effective last summer, the FHA and USDA began calculating monthly student loan payments at 1% of the total amount owed. Regardless of deferment or income-based repayment plans, 1% of the total must be used to calculate a borrower’s debt-to-income ratio (DTI).  If a borrower is on a standard repayment plan, and their monthly payment is greater than 1% of the total amount owed, the actual payment amount will be used.

For example, lets say John has $65,000 in total student loan debt, but he is in deferment for 6 months. His monthly payment will be calculated as $65,000 * 1% (.01) = $650 regardless of what he actually pays each month.  If, however, he is on a standard repayment schedule and his monthly payment is $780 per month, his payment must be qualified at $780.

VA Mortgages and Student Loan Debt

Last month, the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) introduced a new policy regarding how student loan debt is calculated. Prior to this change, it was calculated the same way as FHA and USDA. Now, however, the payment is calculated based on 5% of the total student loan debt, divided by 12 months.

Lets get back to John. In this scenario, John’s payment will be calculated as $65,000 * 5% (.05) / 12 = $271. Under the VA mortgage program, John more easily qualifies, because his DTI is lower.

What if John’s student loans are in deferment? If his repayment is scheduled to begin within 12 months from the estimated closing date, 5% / 12 months calculation must be used. If not, however, the payment can be omitted altogether if written evidence can be provided as such.

Conventional Mortgages and Student Loan Debt

Under Fannie Mae Conventional guidelines, student loan payments are calculated under the same rules as FHA and USDA. Under Freddie Mac Conventional guidelines, however, an IBR payment can be used in place of the calculated amount.

Lets say John is on an income-based repayment structure and only pays $250 per month. John will simply need to provide a statement from his loan servicer showing the actual repayment terms.

Perhaps the best news yet is that our 1% Down Conventional program allows for an actual IBR payment to be used when qualifying a borrower. So, not only can John more easily qualify with a lower DTI, but he can put just 1% down on his home purchase!

Apply for a Mortgage

To apply for a Mortgage, call Riverbank Finance today at 1-800-555-2098.

Request Information Now!